All About Songwriting

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12 Ways To Enhance Your Songwriting Process

I realised a long time ago that when it comes to the songwriting process there’s no such thing as the perfect way of writing songs, it can always be improved upon.

Listed below are twelve ways in which I think you can enhance, improve and eventually master your songwriting process.

Even if you implement just one of these suggestions you will be well on your way to writing more songs and generally being more creative with your life.

Here they are in no particular order of importance:

1. Always keep a journal
I cannot stress enough the importance of documenting what happens in your life and how you think and feel about it. This always creates the foundations of some great songs

2. Always make time for you
If I ask a songwriter why they haven’t written as much as they would like, the reason of not having enough time almost always comes up.

True, to get a song down from mind to paper requires a certain amount of “free” time however, if you make that time every day to write something or play something you are going to feel much better about yourself.

3. Use all of your senses in your song lyrics
We have five senses (see, hear, taste, touch, smell) which we use to experience anything that happens in our lives. Why don’t we use them in our writing as well.

Pay close attention to your senses, be mindful of them in your writing.

4. Become perpetually curious with the world
I have a theory that songwriting is life. Songwriting is our way of making sense of the world around us. If we become perpetually curious with the world around us we will have more to write about. Some ways in which you can do this:

    • Always ask ‘why’ either out loud or in your own mind
    • Go out of your way to experience life to the fullest
    • Take some risks
    • Do something different every day
    • Become open to learn new things

Life is about experiences, so go and find new ones and write them down in song.

5. Tame your inner voice
Most of the time your inner voice attempts to prevent you from doing what you know you should do as a songwriter. This is your ego talking and even though it has good intentions (to ‘protect’ you) what it says to you does not further your cause.

Next time you hear your inner voice mumbling inside your head as your about to do something, try to ignore it and do it anyway.

6. Don’t be afraid of your own writing
Remember, it’s okay to write a ‘bad’ song (whatever that means) and the more ‘bad’ songs you write the closer you are to writing a ‘good’ song. Don’t be afraid of the outcome, just immerse yourself into the songwriting process and marvel at whatever come from it.

7. Listen to lots of music/read lots of books
This is another exercise in making time for yourself. Listening to music attunes your mind to different musical structures and melody combinations and reading books exposes your mind to different word phrases and lyrical snippets that you can use in your own songs.

8. Learn other peoples songs
I am not asking you to become a cover musician however if you learn songs that you have a real affinity with you will begin to really understand why you love that song so much and with that knowledge you can then apply that to your own writing.

If you don’t play an instrument at least know the lyrics and melody of your favourite songs.

9. Find and know thyself
Commit to the concept of finding out who you really are. When you know this you’ll be able to write a love song for instance, and not have it sound like one big cliche because the lyrics will come from you and not an interpretation of what every other songwriter has said.

10. Don’t throw anything away… EVER!
Whether it be on paper or on your computer, don’t throw anything away, don’t delete anything from your hard-drive that pertains to your songwriting process. What you may think is rubbish now could be treasure later on. Our moods change day by day and so does our outlook on what we write.

11. Join a songwriting organisation (or two)
The best way to learn more and to gain confidence in a skill is to experience the input of others. At the very least you will not feel so alone in your songwriting endeavours. Seek out and join one (or more).

12. Find a songwriting collaborator
Two heads are better than one at times. A good collaborator makes you write better, will inspire you to come up with more ideas, will allow you to ask questions, bounce ideas and share ideas much more freely.

Every songwriter should have at least one collaborator in their contacts list.

Phew! There you go. If you have any experiences after applying any of these suggestions (positive or negative) or, you have other suggestions that need to be added to this list, let me know, I’d love to hear from you.

Until next time, keep on writing,

Corey Stewart
All About Songwriting

6 Comments

  1. Probably the best inspiration for me would be visual fiction, There’s already a lot of human effort and imagination that has gone into the production and they tend to pick big tunes to accompany key scenes…which tend to get the emotions fired up.

    I guess the challenge would be to pack 90 minutes of visual story telling into 3.5 minutes of sonic story telling. I’ve only done it properly in one song titled ‘Shawshank’ ..watched the movie, wrote the song.

    If I was to really dig in and say…I’m writing an album in 6 months, it would be armfuls of movies, interspersed with trips into the countryside, with no guitar 🙂

    Oh…and if I was planning on playing covers, I would troll IMDB and find out what songs were used in the most popular movies. Those songs should have the benefit of an emotive connection, leveraged from the movie.. 😉

  2. Hey Chris, what you put forward here is definitely one way of writing songs. I’m sure a lot of people would find external stimuli such as films to be a great source of songwriting inspiration.

    I especially like the concept of playing film songs as covers because of the already established emotional connection the song has with the audience through the film.

    You should follow through with your 6 month album writing challenge using film as your primary motivational source.

    I’d be happy to give you a hand if you like 🙂

  3. Excellent advice! I always try to apply some of these principles to my songwriting. The biggest challenge for me is finding a collaborator. Wish there was an easy way to find one.

    • Corey Stewart

      April 26, 2018 at 7:40 am

      Hi Oliver,

      You and me can always try to collaborate on something. Do you have any ideas you want me to have a look at?

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