All About Songwriting

Songwriting Tips, Ideas & Help In One Songwriting Resource

Category: Creation (page 1 of 6)

Songwriting – Just Show Up And Do The Work

From all of my years of writing songs, one of the main lessons I’ve learnt is that in order to be prolific, you need to be consistent.

You need to just show up and do the work.

There is no use in learning how to write verses, choruses, bridges, middle eights if you don’t take any action in implementing what you’ve learnt.

Plus, there is no use in learning how to refine your songwriting process, cultivate songwriting ideas and internalising songwriting tips if you don’t take any action in implementing what you’ve learnt.

The first steps in taking that action is by simply showing up and doing the work.

I was inspired to write this by a Reece Robertson article called The Simple Power Of Showing Up in which he says that…

The world is facing an epidemic right now; that is everyone wants to be successful, yet no one is willing to put in the work to be successful. We have been dumbed down and turned into dopamine and instant gratification seeking drones at our own will.

This reminded me of experiences I have had in past conversations with songwriters who were complaining about how uninspired they were feeling and how it was the fault of the world that this was the case.

Reece then goes on to say that…

For many, their environment has become so trigger-laden that it seems easier to simply talk about the work, rather than to actually do the work.

BINGO! Therein lies the issue here.

Songwriting (as well as any creative pursuit) is just as much a verb as it is a noun. It’s not enough just to say you’re a songwriter. No, you have to back that up with some songs.

This article also says that you can’t be a writer if you don’t write, you can’t be a cook if you never cook and you can’t be an athlete if you never train.

Writing songs encompasses all of those things. You write, you cook your recipe through your songwriting process and you become better at your craft by writing every day.

This is your training.

Right now, with the FAWM Songwriting Challenge in full swing, this lesson of just showing up and doing the work couldn’t be anymore relevant if it tried.

So, do just that… Show up and do the work, don’t just talk about how many songs you’re going to write. Just write them.

Check out the article The Simple Power Of Showing Up and see if you answer the following question…

What motivates you to write songs?

What gets you out of bed and put pen to paper? Feel free to let me know. I’d love to hear from you.

Until next time, show up, do the work and keep on writing,

Corey Stewart
All About Songwriting

Nine Ways To Stay Calm When Writing Songs Stresses You Out

We all know that sometimes life, stresses you out for many, many different reasons. This is particularly true when writing songs especially if you’re participating in a demanding songwriting challenge such as FAWM or RPM.

In an article on The Guardian website – Deep Breath, Cup Of Tea, Long Walk: Nine Ways To Stay Calm In A CrisisDr Mithu Storoni writes that…

…Your brain records things as you perceive them, not as they actually happen. So if you launch a colossal stress reaction every time someone nudges you on the train, or you read an annoying news headline, or discover you’ve run out of milk, your brain will record your day as having been inordinately stressful when in reality it was quite ordinary. Over time, an overactive emotional brain has trouble bouncing back.

This means that if you find yourself in the middle of a bout of songwriters block it probably means that you need to let go of some of that built up stress you have inside in which the cause of it could’ve come from anywhere.

The nine ways to stay calm in a crisis mentioned in the article are as follows…

  • Gentle morning exercise
  • Spend time with a friend
  • Start the day outside
  • Remember to breathe
  • Take control
  • Pour a brew
  • Immerse yourself in something else
  • Go for a walk
  • Write it down

The above list seems like common sense when you look at it however, I know from experience that common sense flies out the window once you find yourself in the middle of a stressful event such as songwriters block.

Anyways, check out Deep Breath, Cup Of Tea, Long Walk: Nine Ways To Stay Calm In A Crisis and see if you can answer this question…

“What things do you do to stay calm in a stressful situation?”

Right now, I’m going to get away from the computer and enjoy the rest of the weekend by going for a walk.

Until next time, keep on writing,

Corey Stewart
All About Songwriting


Original Article: ‘Deep breath, cup of tea, long walk’: nine ways to stay calm in a crisis | Life and style | The Guardian

5 Things To Do When You’re Stuck In A Creative Rut (Or Unmotivated)

There are many, many times where I’ve felt less than motivated or inspired to put pen to paper and write a song.

Most of the time, I’m able to get past the lack of motivation and exercise my songwriting muscle however, an article 5 Things To Do When You’re Stuck In A Creative Rut (Or Unmotivated) by Sam Matla on the EDMProd blog really put things into perspective for me.

In the article, Sam explains the phenomenon of a creative rut in this fashion…

You know, when you open up your DAW, you’re excited, ready to start a new track, but for some reason you just can’t get anything down! This often leads to unproductive sessions resulting in more frustration and can even cause a long lasting lack of motivation.

It’s annoying, it sucks, and it’s a nightmare for those on a regular release schedule. And unfortunately it’s almost inevitable.

Been there, done that but the five things that Sam mentions in the article are activities that I can see being really beneficial if I incorporated them into my own songwriting process.

  • Take some time out
  • Collaborate with others
  • Organise and prepare
  • Feed your mind
  • Set goals

These activities may seem like common sense however, if you’re like me, the desperation you feel whilst being in the middle of a creative rut makes it really, really easy for your brain to throw common sense out of the window and replace it with the dysfunctional fog of indecision.

I can really see that taking a deep breath and doing one or more activities from the above list would centre you enough to find your way out of the fog.

What do you do when you find yourself in the middle of a songwriters block? Do any of the above list resonate with you or, do you do your own thing to get yourself back on track?

Check out the original article here and if you want to share any of your songwriters block busting tips, feel free to let me know.

Until next time, just keep on writing,

Corey Stewart
All About Songwriting


Original Link: 5 Things to do When You’re Stuck in a Creative Rut (Or Unmotivated)

Your Life As One Continuous Songwriting Process

As songwriters, we need to be eternally vigilant to any opportunity that might arise which enables us to replenish our repository of songwriting ideas.

When we talk about a songwriting process though, we generally talk about engaging in a set of activities that is separate to our lives in general. We live our lives and in between that we have to make the time to write songs then, we start living life again.

My question to you is… Why limit your songwriting process only to activities where you have to make time? Why can’t you make your whole life become one continuous songwriting process?

By doing this, you create a day-to-day life/songwriting ideas loop where one activity (songwriting) can exist within another (day-to-day life) at the same time

Think about it for a moment… When we make the most out of our lives, the experiences gained will make great songs but in turn, when we also write songs about what is happening around us it helps us make the most out of our lives.

Looking at our lives as one continuous and never-ending songwriting process forces us to pay closer attention to what we do in and with our lives and be more mindful it.

I think it was Socrates who once said that “… an unexamined life is a life not worth living.”

There is no reason why you couldn’t find songwriting ideas through the activities that make up your day to day life which will in turn inspire you to find more songwriting ideas.

Imagine your life becoming one big ideas loop. That would be very cool indeed.

This concept would only truly work if first of all, you internalise the habit of being vigilant to any songwriting opportunity that comes along and secondly, to have a means to record the songwriting idea as it happens if it cannot be worked on straight away.

It’s all about being present in the NOW, and with that in mind, I’ve now got a song to write.

Until next time, keep on writing,

Corey Stewart
All About Songwriting

6 Tips for Beating the Blank Page

I believe that songwriting tips, ideas and inspiration can come from anywhere. Especially in areas or disciplines that may not be directly related to writing songs.

A great example of this comes from an article I found on the blogging and freelance writing website Copyblogger called 6 Tips for Beating the Blank Page.

The article is the end result of an epiphany that the author received regarding writers block whilst visiting the Roald Dahl Museum & Story Centre in England.

The epiphany was described by the author Robert Peters in this manner…

As I moved through the museum, listening to audio, reading and looking at various exhibits, I started jotting down aspects of Roald Dahl’s writing process.

It proved to be truly inspirational, and I discovered a few elements of his process that are as important for digital writers and publishers today as they were for him when he was writing his books more than 50 years ago.

The six tips Robert listed are as follows…

  • Capture every idea
  • Create a place to work
  • Create a routine
  • Use the right tools
  • Perfect your writing
  • Do the work

My favourite tip is the last one “Do the work” as it encapsulates all of the other tips into one phrase.

When you write a song, you’re doing the work, you’re getting on with the job and you’re not waiting for the muse to knock at your door. If you don’t do the work, you don’t write any songs.

Seems very obvious but there has been a time in every songwriters journey where doing the work has been the least obvious thing to be doing.

I think Picasso said it best when he said that…

Inspiration exists, but it has to find us working

Read the article 6 Tips for Beating the Blank Page and have a think about how these tips relate to your songwriting process. Do you relate to them? Can you add to the list?

Let me know what you come up with.

Until next time, keep on writing

Corey Stewart
All About Songwriting


Original Link: 6 Tips for Beating the Blank Page – Copyblogger

Some Songwriting Inspiration Tips For You

As songwriters, we all need a bit of inspiration every now and then to keep our songwriting process moving along which is why a two part series of Songwriting Inspiration Tips from the Bandzoogle Blog gives us all a timely reminder that songwriting inspiration can be manufactured through disciplined activity rather than just waiting for it to appear from the ether.

Part 1 of the Songwriting Inspiration Tips series starts off with the following statement…

When you’re suffering from writer’s block, the solution can come in many forms, including de-stressing, self-care, external influence, or some sort of inspiration. For the songwriter, two types of inspiration can help: internal or external (sometimes both!)

The article goes on to list internal and external activities that you can do to generate songwriting inspiration for yourself while Part 2 gives us…

…non-traditional ways to inspire hit songs by using numbers, letters or sounds.

Both articles are definitely well worth the read if you’re looking for ways to increase your ability to generate songwriting ideas. I know I certainly got a lot out of it.

Until next time, keep on writing,

Corey Stewart
All About Songwriting


Original Links:

10 Ridiculous Songwriting Tips That Actually Work.

I just typed “songwriting tips” into Google just now and I was staggered by the amount of search results on offer. There were 30.9 million of them to go through.

If you go through the websites on the first couple of pages of Google you’ll see a wide range of songwriting tips mentioned however, after a while you’ll notice that the songwriting tips all start sounding the same.

That is, until I come across the article  10 Ridiculous Songwriting Tips That Actually Work” on the online mastering website LANDR.

The article acknowledges that a lot of songwriting tips online sound the same but in regards to their songwriting tips the article goes on to say…

But these tips are the special ones. The ones that put you and your ideas first. The ones that open up some time to really focus, experiment and make your songs work.

I’ll be honest, the article title grabbed me first and foremost. “How ridiculous are these tips?” I asked myself, but once I started to read the article I realised that I hadn’t seen these songwriting tips before.

I started to get excited about how I could incorporate these tips into my own songwriting process.

My 3 favourite tips in the article are…

  • Play 5 radios at once (#1)
  • Don’t talk for the entire day. Just listen (#3)
  • Cut your lyrics into a million pieces (#8)

Make a point of reading 10 Ridiculous Songwriting Tips That Actually Work and see if there are any other ridiculous tips you can add onto the list and make sure you let me know what they are so we can all benefit from getting a little bit ridiculous with our songwriting process.

Until next time, keep on writing,

Corey Stewart
All About Songwriting


Original Link: 10 Ridiculous Songwriting Tips That Actually Work | LANDR Blog

How to Write a Song | 10 Songwriting Tips from the Pros

If you hadn’t noticed, there’s a lot of information online about how to write a song. Some of that information is pretty light on the detail and heavy on the SEO (search engine optimization), while others are of a very good standard.

However, one of the best articles I’ve come across so far on the subject is an article that appears on the Ditto website called How To Write A Song – 10 Songwriting Tips From The Pros.

Ditto is an online music distributor that helps artists sell their music online through iTunes, Spotify and many, many other outlets so I would imagine that their knowledge about how to write a song or two would be very high to say the least.

As the article says…

Writing a song with unforgettable melodies and creative lyrics can be challenging. Even the most experienced songwriters go through writer’s block at some point in their career, and there are many different approaches to songwriting. Here are 10 helpful songwriting tips, each backed up by quotes from some of the world’s most successful songwriters.

Personally, I found their list of ten songwriting tips to be very beneficial to my own songwriting process. The tips make sense and flow on from each other but the one tip that really stood out for me was the last one…

Don’t Be Afraid To Fail

Now, there’s a real lesson to be learnt for all of the perfectionists out there (me included).

Go ahead and read the article and see if you can add your own songwriting tips to the list provided. Also, let me know what those tips are either through making a comment below or by contacting me.

Until next time, keep on writing,

Corey Stewart
All About Songwriting


Original Link: How to Write a Song | 10 Songwriting Tips from the Pros

13 Love Song Ideas That Listeners Love

It’s generally accepted that most songs are written about the universally perennial topic of love and all of its complicated offshoots.

Listeners (mainly females) just can’t get enough of love songs.

From the innocent musings of early Lennon/McCartney Beatles tunes to the smooth contemporary vibes of songwriters like Ed Sheeran and John Legend it seems that love and songwriting go hand.

Songwriters also love writing love songs but struggle sometimes with the concept of writing a love song that hasn’t been written before.

In a world full of songs about love it can be hard for your song to stand out but this is where an article from songwriter Nicholas Tozier comes to the rescue.

Nicholas runs a songwriting blog called The Lyric Writers Workroom and through his article titled 13 Love Song Ideas That Listeners Love, he describes the many heads of the love song animal which will give a songwriter more information as to what type of love song he or she is going to write.

He also goes on to say in his article…

When you write a love song, you explore themes that everybody can relate to: from the rush of flirting with an attractive stranger, to the constant tug of infatuation that distracts a lover’s mind all day. The shaky knees before going out, the warm comforts of coming home to a long-term partner, the sick-to-your-stomach heartbreak… the world is in love with love songs.

It certainly opened my eyes into the possibility of writing more love songs without feeling that I’ve done it all before.

What are you views on writing love song? Do you jump into writing them head first or, you avoid writing them like the plague because as Paul McCartney once said “you think that people would have had enough of silly love songs.”

To finish things off, here is McCartney’s “Silly Love Songs” for the sake of balance…

Until next time, keep on writing (love songs),

Corey Stewart
All About Songwriting


Here is the original link: 13 Love Song Ideas That Listeners Love

Any Songwriters Wishing To Collaborate? Let Me Know!

Let me cut to the chase here. I want to work with lyricists, poets, writers and other creative individuals.

Are you out there? If you are, I’d love to talk with you.

I’ve been taking a dip in the collaboration pool for a little while now and I’m loving it.

You see, I’m at the point in my songwriting where I’m very comfortable either writing songs by myself or with others but I still think that collaborating with others is the next step in my development as a songwriter.

I want to be able to shape songs out of different points of view and be challenged by sonically interpreting the experiences of others.

The first of two main challenges I have in my songwriting process at the moment is lyric writing. I’m working on it but I learn so much more from working with other lyricists.

This admission may seem strange coming from someone like me who has written a lot about lyric writing and song idea gathering tips in earlier posts but I do try to practise what I preach.

I do write down the phrases I hear in conversation, I record all of my musical and lyrical ideas and I do make copious lists of possible song titles but my inner critic still has a field day every time I try to put lyrics down onto paper.

You see, my inner critic is a very persuasive and persistent entity and quite frankly, I’m becoming snowed under with all of my half finished songwriting ideas

I’m hoping that collaborating with other (song) writers will enable me to learn from them (and them from me) plus we’ll finish a few songs along the way.

This is especially pertinent with the 50/90 Songwriting Challenge just finished for this year.

So, are there any writers that want to collaborate with me? If so, let me know and lets start making beautiful music together.

I’ll even showcase our songs on All About Songwriting.

Until next time, happy writing,

Corey Stewart
All About Songwriting

« Older posts